Thursday, December 31, 2020

Sunstar Americas Inc. Expands Voluntary Nationwide Recall of Paroex® Chlorhexidine Gluconate Oral Rinse USP, 0.12% Due to Microbial Contamination

 


What follows is an important announcement for those of us in the dental field that comes from the FDA.  It seems that Paroex (Chlorhexidine Gluconate Oral Rinse USP, 0.12%) has suffered bacterial contamination.  Due to this, the product is undergoing a recall.  Obviously this is important for anyone that is prescribing this rinse to patients. 

This is an especially critical announcement with its potential to affect patients with respiratory problems like Covid-19.  Please read this entire post as I feel it provides critical information.

Peridex is still available as it is made by a different manufacturer.

Here is the FDA announcement:

Company Announcement

Schaumburg, Illinois, Sunstar Americas, Inc. (SAI) is voluntarily recalling Paroex® Chlorhexidine Gluconate Oral Rinse USP, 0.12% products bearing an expiration date from 12/31/2020 – 9/30/2022 to the consumer level. This product may be contaminated with the bacteria Burkholderia lata. This is an expansion of the recall initially announced on October 27, 2020.

Use of the defective product in the immunocompetent host may result in oral and, potentially, systemic infections requiring antibacterial therapy. In the most at-risk populations, the use of the defective product may result in life-threatening infections, such as pneumonia and bacteremia.

To date, 29 adverse events have been reported to SAI related to this recall. Affected patients tested positive for Burkholderia lata infections, typically found in sputum cultures while under treatment for other serious medical conditions. Use of the contaminated product on patients with pre-existing respiratory conditions, including those infected with Covid-19, is particularly unsafe.

The prescription oral rinse product, available through healthcare professionals only, is indicated for use as part of a professional program for the treatment of gingivitis and is packaged as follows:

  • 1789P GUM® Paroex® is distributed in cases each containing 6 amber bottles of 16 fluid ounce (473 ml) chlorhexidine rinse. The bottle has a childproof cap and a 15 ml metered dosage cup, is safety sealed, and is decorated with a multiple-panel wrap-around label.
  • 1788P GUM® Paroex® is distributed in cases each containing 24 amber bottles of 4 fluid ounce (118.25 ml) chlorhexidine rinse. The bottle has a childproof cap, is safety sealed, and is decorated with a multiple-panel wrap-around label.

The product can be identified as shown in the images below

Paroex was distributed Nationwide to Dental offices, Dental distributors, Pharmaceutical wholesalers, Dental schools, and Pharmacies.

SAI is notifying its direct distributors and customers by USPS Priority mail and is arranging for return of all recalled products. Patients, pharmacies, and healthcare facilities in possession of these products should stop using and dispensing immediately.

Consumers with questions regarding this recall can contact SAI by phone at 1-800-528-8537 or email us.pcr@us.sunstar.com on Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm CST. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to using this drug product.

Affected products and lot numbers follow below:

Product name:

Paroex® Chlorhexidine Gluconate Oral Rinse USP, 0.12%

Size/ Form:

16 fl.oz. Amber Bottles

NDC #:

052376-021-02

Product Code:

1789P

Lots Recalled:

ALL LOTS with expiration date from Dec. 31, 2020 through Sep. 30, 2022





 

Product name:

Paroex® Chlorhexidine Gluconate Oral Rinse USP, 0.12%

Size/ Form:

4 fl.oz. Amber Bottles

NDC #:

052376-021-04

Product Code:

1788P

Lots Recalled:

ALL LOTS with expiration date from Dec. 31, 2020 through Sep. 30, 2022

Adverse reactions or quality problems experienced with the use of this product may be reported to the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online, by regular mail or by fax.

  • Complete and submit the report Online
  • Regular Mail or Fax: Download form or call 1- 800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

Sunstar is committed to delivering safe, fully compliant products of the highest quality and is taking necessary steps to prevent future occurrence of this issue.

This recall is being conducted with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

About Sunstar Americas Inc.

Sunstar Americas, Inc., a member of the Sunstar Group of companies, is a global organization headquartered in Switzerland that is a leader in the oral care industry and the manufacturer and distributor of the GUM and Butler Brands.

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

Ransomware May Get Worse in 2021

 


I love the website ZD Net.  As a techie, I've been reading their stuff for a long, long time.  It's well written and insightful stuff.

A recent article I read there gives a good view of where Ransomware is headed in the year about to start.  As most people now know, the scourge of Ransomware isn't going to go away any time soon and the criminals behind it continue to evolve the problems it can cause.

One of the latest problems has been criminals stealing data before encrypting it.  The hackers then threaten the victim to not only pay to decrypt their data, but if they refuse to pay, the criminals threaten to release confidential stolen data to the world at large.

Of course this can be a huge problem for any company, but especially those in healthcare who also have to worry about data security due to HIPAA.  A small dental practice hit with something like this could easily be fined large amounts by the federal government as well as having to pay the ransom.

ZD Net is now voicing concerns about perhaps the next "step up" in Ransomware, moving it to the cloud.  Broadband has become so ubiquitous that "the network is now the computer".  This has allowed many companies to move tons of their computer processing into the realm of the cloud.  However, the problem with the cloud & Ransomware is one of scale.  If bad guys manage to infect a cloud server, they could theoretically then infect everyone with access to that cloud server.  This could create an infection on a logarithmic scale.  One cloud infection mighty very well create an infection of multiple systems.

Last year, there was a similar type of situation where dental software providers had installed on client office computers a program that allowed the software companies to access the dental office computers remotely.  The idea was that if there was a problem, the software provider could immediately access the problem computer and fix it.

However, the software companies themselves became infected by Ransomware, which then used the remote access programs to infect and encrypt the remote computers in 400 dental offices.  It took several days to get things straightened out.

Now imagine if a huge SAAS type company was similarly infected.  It could be a nightmare.  This could especially be a huge problem if this occurred in hospitals.

The worst part of this is that clients currently have a difficult time with backing up SAAS systems (at least that I'm aware of).  A pristine backup that is timely is currently the best way to fight the scourge of Ransomware, but if you cannot get a backup, things get dicey.

For the full story from ZD Net, here is the link.  

Tuesday, December 29, 2020

U.S. Department of Transportation Issues Two Much-Anticipated Drone Rules to Advance Safety and Innovation in the United States

 


For you drone pilots out there (maybe even some of you were lucky enough to get one from Santa!), here is the latest news from the FAA.  As the drone hobby becomes more popular and the use of drones becomes more commercialized, the federal government is going to need a better way to track all of these vehicles when they are airborne.  I'm sure that as we see even more drones operating, they will need better and better ways to track them.  If you've ever seen a map that shows the number of aircraft in the air at any one time, it's pretty amazing how many there are.  If you add to that, the number of drones in the air, it's got to be even crazier.

The interesting part of this is that the FAA wants some type of "tracker" on the drone.  Coming from the factory with one is no problem, adding them after-market will be a bit of a hassle, but I'm all for safety.  Here's what the FAA has to say:


The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today announced final rules for Unmanned Aircraft (UA), commonly known as drones. The new rules will require Remote Identification (Remote ID) of drones and allow operators of small drones to fly over people and at night under certain conditions. These rules come at a time when drones represent the fastest-growing segment in the entire transportation sector – with currently over 1.7 million drone registrations and 203,000 FAA-certificated remote pilots.

Remote ID will help mitigate risks associated with expanded drone operations, such as flights over people and at night, and both rules support technological and operational innovation and advancements.

“These final rules carefully address safety, security and privacy concerns while advancing opportunities for innovation and utilization of drone technology,” said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao.

Remote ID (PDF) is a major step toward the full integration of drones into the national airspace system. Remote ID provides identification of drones in flight as well as the location of their control stations, providing crucial information to our national security agencies and law enforcement partners, and other officials charged with ensuring public safety. Airspace awareness reduces the risk of drone interference with other aircraft and people and property on the ground.

Equipping drones with Remote ID technology builds on previous steps taken by the FAA and the drone industry to integrate operations safely into the national airspace system. Part 107 of the federal aviation regulations currently prohibits covered drone operations over people and at night unless the operator obtains a waiver from the FAA. The new FAA regulations jointly provide increased flexibility to conduct certain small UAS without obtaining waiver.

“The new rules make way for the further integration of drones into our airspace by addressing safety and security concerns,” said FAA Administrator Steve Dickson. “They get us closer to the day when we will more routinely see drone operations such as the delivery of packages.”

The Remote ID rule (PDF) applies to all operators of drones that require FAA registration. There are three ways to comply with the operational requirements:

1. Operate a standard Remote ID drone that broadcasts identification and location information of the drone and control station;

2. Operate a drone with a Remote ID broadcast module (may be a separate device attached to the drone), which broadcasts identification, location, and take-off information; or

3. Operate a drone without Remote ID but at specific FAA-recognized identification areas.

The Operations Over People and at Night rule (PDF) applies to Part 107 operators. The ability to fly over people and moving vehicles varies depending on the level of risk a small drone operation presents to people on the ground. Operations are permitted based on four categories, which can be found in the executive summary (PDF) accompanying the rule. Additionally, this rule allows for operations at night under certain conditions.

The final rule requires that small drone operators have their remote pilot certificate and identification in their physical possession when operating, ready to present to authorities if needed. This rule also expands the class of authorities who may request these forms from a remote pilot. The final rule replaces the requirement to complete a recurrent test every 24 calendar months with the requirement to complete updated recurrent training that includes operating at night in identified subject areas. 

Both rules will become effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register. The Remote ID rule includes two compliance dates. Drone manufacturers will have 18 months to begin producing drones with Remote ID, with operators having an additional year to start using drones with Remote ID.

Contact Information: pressoffice@faa.gov

Monday, December 28, 2020

AMD Lasers is Offering a Tremendous End of Year Sale!

 



For those of you who are looking for either new technology or the chance to invest in technology to help with your income tax situation, you might want to check out AMD Lasers.  

The company is offering tremendous deals on many of their devices between now and the end of the year.  AMD is a pioneer in the field of affordable lasers for dentistry.  They have revolutionized the use of lasers in the practice of dentistry by making quality diode lasers and offering them for prices that don't require an appointment with the accountant to accommodate the purchase.

However, the "End of Year Sale" covers more than just lasers.  While many people are not yet aware, AMD is also a technology company and also a PPE company.  When the pandemic strucky, AMD quickly pivoted to help doctors cope with the myriad changes in our clinical practices.  Their division called Aegis has been selling infection control since early on in the battle against SARS-CoV-2.  

The company was very fast to market with their awesome VacStation air purification device.  They also sell products such as laser based "no touch" thermometers, masks, and reusable coveralls... just to name a few.

All of these products are on sale through December 31st.

I personally use quite a few of their products in my practice and can assure that they are first rate.  AMD products are *highly recommended* and even more so now that you can get them for a tremendous discount.  Be sure to check them out!

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

NORAD Tracks Santa Starting on Christmas Eve!

 


The North American Aerospace Defense Command is preparing to track Santa as he delivers gifts around the world on Christmas Eve.  This year, is the 65th Anniversary of this amazing event.  I want to personally thank all of the military personnel who work to make this happen.  I'm grateful for ALL you do plus those of you who are giving your time to help answer the phones to talk to children are performing an amazing service.  I can't emphasize enough how proud of you I am!

To track Santa on his journey, follow this link.

This year, there will be some changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Here is all of the info on this year's program, straight from NORAD:

NORAD is busy preparing for its annual tradition of tracking Santa's journey delivering gifts around the world.  Despite the challenges presented by COVID-19, the NORAD Tracks Santa program is on schedule and NORAD will track Santa on December 24th, as we have done every year since 1955.

As we move forward in our preparations for this year's NORAD Tracks Santa program, some adjustmetns are being made to safely carry out our special mission of tracking Santa.

The NORAD Tracks Santa website, social media pages, a new mobile app, and partner platforms will again be an important part of the program allowing children around the world to track Santa.  However, The NORAD Tracks Santa call center is being adapted due to ongoing public health concerns due to an increase in COVID-19 cases.  This year, only a small number of volunteers will be answering the NORAD Tracks Santa toll-free number, 1-877-Hi-NORAD, on December 24th.  Callers who cannot reach one of these volunteers will receive a recorded update on Santa's current location.  While NORAD understands the call center is an important tradition for many families around the world, we reduce the health risks posed by attempting to conduct a large indoor, in-person, call center during the pandemic.  NORAD is committed to tracking Santa while keeping our military, their families, and our dedicated call center volunteers safe.

Santa trackers can visit http://www.horadsanta.org or use new mobile apps to get up-to-the-minute Santa statistics.  These apps will soon be available on Google Play and the Apple App Store.  Fans can also track Santa with a variety of other NORAD Tracks Santa partners, to include OnStar and Amazon Alexa.

Our online and social media experience will go live December 1 and will provide information and games to get everyone ready for the big night.  NORAD Tracks Santa will also provide daily updates to its 2.1million social media followers across its Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram platforms.

NORAD looks forward to bringing the 65th year of NORAD Tracks Santa to children and families around the world.

Tuesday, December 22, 2020

Monet Handheld Curing Laser Testing Will be Coming Soon...

 


Earlier this month, the smart people at AMD Lasers announced they had begun taking orders for the new Monet Handheld Curing Laser.  I have a hunch that this device is the most powerful curing device ever created for dentistry.

In the early days of light cured resins, a small number of lasers appeared on the market that could set composite resins.  However, the devices were very expensive and very large.  The devices were about the size of a box containing a pair of Air Jordan shoes... which meant they were NOT portable... even within an office.  They also had a massive amount of electronics that created a fair amount of heat (not from the laser beam, but from the electronics that created the beam).  Because the device had so much heat generating  circuitry they also required powerful and noisy cooling fans.  It was quite a tradeoff for a 10 second cure.

The Monet has changed all of that.  As you can see in the photo above, the Monet is the size we've come to expect of a curing light.  I'm mightily impressed by the fact that what used to take a large shoebox sized unit has been shrunk down to the size of an electric toothbrush.  I'm not sure how AMD has managed to create this device, but it's an impressive design.

I have been experimenting and tinkering with the Monet for several months.  The energy output is amazing and the intensity of the beam is second to none.

I always try and take some time off over the holidays to rest and recharge, and this year while I'm doing that I'm also going to be working on some videos and photos of the Monet and just what it can accomplish.  There has never been curing light that has this kind of intensity and I think I've got some fun ways to demonstrate how powerful it is.

I'll most likely make at least one post about my demos here, but you'll also be able to find them over on my YouTube Channel as well...

Monday, December 21, 2020

What Our Profession can Learn from the Recent SolarWinds Hack

 

In the previous few days, I'm sure you've heard something about a hack involving a company called SolarWinds.  This hack was created by a nation state in the hopes of learning some of the deepest secrets kept by the U.S. Government.  The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency say the threat "poses a grave risk to the federal government".

This action was perpetrated by what is usually referred to as an "Advanced Persistent Threat" (APT).  This is fancy government speak for another government with the funds and means to spy that is beyond the means of individuals and organizations.  Experts fear that perhaps the intrusions began as early as March 2020 and have compromised a significant amount of information from the federal government.  The speculation is that the data monitoring and theft is widespread, so far  the Department of Energy  the Department of Commerce, National Institutes of Health, Department of Homeland Security (ugh!) and the Department of the Treasury have confirmed they were attacked.

Why would something like this be of interest to our profession?  First of all, practitioners are supposed to keep their data safe, but the NIH and Homeland Security can't?  That seems to be asking a lot of a business like mine with 15 employees when compared with Homeland Security, right?  But also, there are a lot of lessons that can be learned here, but one of the biggest lessons, I think, is the way these attacks were perpetrated and that aspect is something anyone with a business can learn from.  

The breach came by way of what is referred to as a "supply-chain attack".  If you've read or followed this situation at all, you've become well acquainted with the company name "SolarWinds".  The reason for that is a pretty simple one... the vulnerability that created this whole mess was brought about by a weakness in a program created by SolarWinds.  The program was supposed to help IT specialists monitor and manage large computer networks... and it worked pretty well.  In fact it worked well enough to be used by many very large companies who incorporated it into managing their computers.  18,000 companies used it.

The hackers saw a great opportunity here.  Rather than hack 18,000 individual systems, they saw a way to hack ONE company, SolarWinds, and then use that hack to provide access to the 18,000 others.  The companies that used SolarWinds had their software setup to automatically download updates to keep the system current.  So the hackers found a way into SolarWinds and hacked their software.  Then they sat back and waited while the victim's computers downloaded the program with the backdoor built into it.  Once installed, the hackers then had access to that system.

This is similar to a situation that happened in dentistry in late 2019 where a dental IT company had installed backdoor software onto their client's computers so that they could remotely access and fix problems without involving the office.  Unfortunately hackers got into the IT company's system which then gave them unfettered access to the client systems as well.

These "Supply Chain Attacks" are difficult on everyone involved.  The convenience for the client is unquestionably easier than having to have someone allow access every time it is needed; especially in a small office with minimal staffing.  This is definitely a weakness that the business owner needs to be aware of.

On the topic of SolarWinds and how this debacle came about, there is a really great Op-Ed piece available from the New York Times.  It is written by Thomas Bossert who is a true expert in this realm.  Many of you may know Mr. Bossert as the gentleman who appeared on 60 Minutes recently to speak about how secure the 2020 election was.  He was fired by President Trump shortly after announcing that the 2020 election was the "most secure election in U.S. history".  His article is a truly interesting read on this situation.


Thursday, December 17, 2020

The Newest Composite in the OMNICHROMA Product Family- OMNICHROMA FLOW – will be Available Starting 02.01.2021

 



Here is the latest from Tokuyama.  As most of you know, in February of 2019, Tokuyama introduced Omnichroma composite.  This game changing material became the "go to" material for a lot of offices simply because it matched the surrounding tooth structure SO WELL that you didn't need other materials with a variety of available shades.  Basically. you could just put Omnichroma into the preparation and the shade was perfect.  

No longer did an office need to keep an inventory of shades to match teeth.  Omnichroma was sort of a "one size fits all" material... only it was a "one shade fits all" material.

Now, after two years on the market, the smart minds at Tokuyama have created a flowable with the same optical properties.  Here is what the company has to say about Omnichroma Flow:

Many clinicians like you have experienced and appreciate the benefits of saving time and money with the world’s first one-shade universal composite OMNICHROMA. Now, the same benefits are made available in a flowable consistency to address more restorative needs.

 

Utilizing Smart Chromatic Technology and uniformly sized supra-nano spherical fillers, OMNICHROMA FLOW is the world’s first one-shade flowable composite to esthetically match every color of tooth from A1 to D4 with a single shade of composite. Its high strength and wear resistance make it suitable for a wide range of indications beyond cavity lining and minor restorations, giving you the freedom of choice for nearly all direct restorations.


The benefits of a one-shade composite you love, now in the versatile handling you need!



Outstanding Features

  • Unprecedented shade matching
  • High polish ability
  • High stain resistance
  • Flexural and compressive strength suitable for wide range of indications
  • Low wear and abrasion
  • Low polymerization shrinkage


Indications

  • All cases of direct anterior and posterior restorations
  • Cavity base or liner
  • Repair of porcelain/composite

Wednesday, December 16, 2020

Top 5 Test Drives of 2020



Writing this article every year is one of the highlights of my work here at Dental Products Report®. As many of you know, throughout the year I get to evaluate a fair number of new or improved products. I keep a list of my favorites, and the 5 I like the best end up as my top 5 test-drives.

I hope you enjoy reading this as much as I enjoy tinkering with and evaluating new ideas and products.


We’ve seen some tremendous advances in curing lights over the years. The devices continue to get smaller and more powerful every year. Every curing light on the market is slim and ergonomic and has more than enough power to cure any shade of composite. As the market stabilized, I thought we had pretty much seen just about all the tricks that photopolymerization had up its sleeve…and then came PinkWave.

The PinkWave from Vista | Apex uses a unique array of LEDs, some of which give off a pinkish glow. In the last few years we’ve seen companies produce broadband curing lights with wavelengths that cure any material on the market. The PinkWave does even more by offering its QuadWave Technology to provide even more curing energy. QuadWave consists of ultraviolet light, blue light, red light, and NIR (near infrared) to deliver an incredible cure. In addition to the curing LEDs, Vista | Apex included a white LED that can be switched on separately to turn the PinkWave into a transilluminator.

The device can provide a 4.7-mm depth of cure, and company studies show a 15% decrease in polymerization shrinkage. The company also says there is a 19% increase in polymerization, and the curing head is currently the largest on the market at 115 mm2.

Current “blue only” lights put out different wavelengths of blue. The problem is that the blue light is easily absorbed by the pulp. As blue lights have become more powerful, they are also putting a fair amount of heat into pulpal tissues. The NIR wavelength is not absorbed by the pulp. This decreases postoperative sensitivity that may be caused by heat absorption by the pulp while generating better depth of cure.

VOCO VisCalor bulk

This is a pretty amazing composite that I’ve been using for about 2 months. By the time you read this, you should be able to order it and see for yourself.

VisCalor is an interesting material. It is a thermoviscous bulk fill composite, which means it is used in a specialized composite warming gun. The gun warms the compules using infrared energy, and this heat energy makes VisCalor flowable. With the special warming gun you express the composite into the prep where it is easily sculpted. My best description of the viscosity is that it is similar to cake icing. The material is smooth and very easy to work with.

Its low viscosity allows it to easily adapt to proximal boxes and hard to reach undercuts.

The compule is designed with a thin cannula diameter that makes placement very simple, and the low viscosity of the warmed material allows it to pass through the cannula easily.

Another great feature is the composite’s esthetic appeal. I found that VisCalor blends incredibly well with surrounding tooth structure. It comes in 4 shades, and I have yet to find a case where the restoration wasn’t almost invisible when finished.

It polishes well, and it can be placed in 4-mm increments, handy for bulk filling in many clinical applications. VOCO has always been an industry leader, but VisCalor takes it to a whole new level.

Aegis Aerosol VacStation

In this crazy, topsy-turvy pandemic world, we are seeing our infection controls taken to new levels. Before 2020 we were more concerned about bloodborne pathogens or those spread by bodily fluids, but then along came SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019. Suddenly we also had to be concerned about airborne pathogens.

What to do? How about filtering the air—better yet, filter it as soon as it leaves the patient’s mouth. That’s the concept behind the Aegis Aerosol VacStation.

The VacStation is a high-powered system that has a large, positionable hose that attaches to a powerful vacuum. The other end of the hose has a large clear plastic dome that can be positioned very close to the oral cavity.

The device creates a suction of 3.5 m3, which can recirculate the air in a standard 8 x 8-ft room every 5 minutes. Air is then moved through 4 types of filtration: high fiber, fiberglass, active carbon, and LEDs, which are on a wavelength known to kill viruses.

This unit has been independently evaluated by the Medical University of South Carolina to reduce spatter and aerosols to almost zero.

Also, patients are impressed when they see units such as this cleaning the air. They know we are doing all we can to protect everyone in the office.

SprintRay Pro 95 3D Printer

Vista-Apex PinkWave

We’ve seen some tremendous advances in curing lights over the years. The devices continue to get smaller and more powerful every year. Every curing light on the market is slim and ergonomic and has more than enough power to cure any shade of composite. As the market stabilized, I thought we had pretty much seen just about all the tricks that photopolymerization had up its sleeve…and then came PinkWave.

The PinkWave from Vista | Apex uses a unique array of LEDs, some of which give off a pinkish glow. In the last few years we’ve seen companies produce broadband curing lights with wavelengths that cure any material on the market. The PinkWave does even more by offering its QuadWave Technology to provide even more curing energy. QuadWave consists of ultraviolet light, blue light, red light, and NIR (near infrared) to deliver an incredible cure. In addition to the curing LEDs, Vista | Apex included a white LED that can be switched on separately to turn the PinkWave into a transilluminator.

The device can provide a 4.7-mm depth of cure, and company studies show a 15% decrease in polymerization shrinkage. The company also says there is a 19% increase in polymerization, and the curing head is currently the largest on the market at 115 mm2.

Current “blue only” lights put out different wavelengths of blue. The problem is that the blue light is easily absorbed by the pulp. As blue lights have become more powerful, they are also putting a fair amount of heat into pulpal tissues. The NIR wavelength is not absorbed by the pulp. This decreases postoperative sensitivity that may be caused by heat absorption by the pulp while generating better depth of cure.

VOCO VisCalor bulk

This is a pretty amazing composite that I’ve been using for about 2 months. By the time you read this, you should be able to order it and see for yourself.

VisCalor is an interesting material. It is a thermoviscous bulk fill composite, which means it is used in a specialized composite warming gun. The gun warms the compules using infrared energy, and this heat energy makes VisCalor flowable. With the special warming gun you express the composite into the prep where it is easily sculpted. My best description of the viscosity is that it is similar to cake icing. The material is smooth and very easy to work with.

Its low viscosity allows it to easily adapt to proximal boxes and hard to reach undercuts.

The compule is designed with a thin cannula diameter that makes placement very simple, and the low viscosity of the warmed material allows it to pass through the cannula easily.

Another great feature is the composite’s esthetic appeal. I found that VisCalor blends incredibly well with surrounding tooth structure. It comes in 4 shades, and I have yet to find a case where the restoration wasn’t almost invisible when finished.

It polishes well, and it can be placed in 4-mm increments, handy for bulk filling in many clinical applications. VOCO has always been an industry leader, but VisCalor takes it to a whole new level.

Aegis Aerosol VacStation

In this crazy, topsy-turvy pandemic world, we are seeing our infection controls taken to new levels. Before 2020 we were more concerned about bloodborne pathogens or those spread by bodily fluids, but then along came SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019. Suddenly we also had to be concerned about airborne pathogens.

What to do? How about filtering the air—better yet, filter it as soon as it leaves the patient’s mouth. That’s the concept behind the Aegis Aerosol VacStation.

The VacStation is a high-powered system that has a large, positionable hose that attaches to a powerful vacuum. The other end of the hose has a large clear plastic dome that can be positioned very close to the oral cavity.

The device creates a suction of 3.5 m3, which can recirculate the air in a standard 8 x 8-ft room every 5 minutes. Air is then moved through 4 types of filtration: high fiber, fiberglass, active carbon, and LEDs, which are on a wavelength known to kill viruses.

This unit has been independently evaluated by the Medical University of South Carolina to reduce spatter and aerosols to almost zero.

Also, patients are impressed when they see units such as this cleaning the air. They know we are doing all we can to protect everyone in the office.

SprintRay Pro 95 3D Printer

Printing in 3D has come to dentistry in a big way, and one of the true market leaders is SprintRay. Their newest 3D printer is the SprintRay Pro, and I’ve been working with it a lot this year.

Printing in 3D allows dentists to expand the scope of care by being able to create an amazing number of dental items.

The SprintRay Pro is a digital light processing device that uses a special light source to photopolymerize a type of liquid resin (the science is very similar to composites). The printer has a tub that is filled with the liquid resin. A build plate is lowered into the resin. The light source polymerizes layers in the liquid, which harden. Then the polymerized materials are attached to the build plate, which is mechanically raised slowly out of the resin as each layer is added. As the build plate rises, bit by bit, more and more layers are polymerized, until finally the finished project rises out of the resin.

The device can create many types of dental appliances and prosthetics such as surgical guides, study models, models for aligner production, indirect bonding trays, digital dentures, and occlusal guards.

The SprintRay Pro is fast; it can print models in under an hour in most cases. When you combine this speed with an accuracy of 55 microns, you get an incredibly accurate and precise device that has many applications in today’s dental office.

The device is connected to your office network, which means it can be accessed and used from any computer in your office. It also allows the printer to automatically check for and download updates from SprintRay. The company is always updating the software that drives the machine, so new features are always being added.

Offices also are supplied with RayWare, which is SprintRay’s design, build, and layout software. Intraoral scanners create their data as STL files, which can be downloaded. Simply drag and drop an STL file into RayWare and it will render the file in 3D and place it on the build plate. Depending on the size of your project, you can place multiple projects on the build plate, which means you can print multiple models or other things at the same time.

Being able to fabricate something like an occlusal guard in 3D in a couple of hours is a great service to your patients and a boon to your marketing.

Bringing device fabrication in-house lowers your costs and speeds delivery while also producing incredibly accurate appliances. That translates as “cheaper, faster, better,” which is always good for the bottom line of a business.

Printing in 3D is affordable and definitely the wave of the future in dentistry. The time to get into this market is now.

Axsys Versamill 5X400

For decades, if you wanted to do same-day crowns, there were only 2 companies that offered dentists in-office milling. Now with technology expanding, doctors have many more options to accomplish this goal. The best part is that this aspect of care has moved almost totally to open source. This means that, instead of being tied into 1 system, doctors can pick and choose the intraoral scanner and mill they like the best.

In my office, those devices are the iTero Element and the Axsys Versamill 5X400.

The Versamill is an impressive piece of equipment. It is a true 5-axis simultaneous motion mill. Watching it work is fascinating. It can mill pretty much anything in any shape. That is the result of the 5-axis process, as well as 7 available tools that the device can change automatically as needed. It’s also incredibly fast due to its 60,000 rpm 500w spindle that spins the tools.

Most of us are familiar with CAD/CAM blocks, which allow mills to create single units. The Versamill will accept similar blocks, but it will also take discs (often referred to as pucks) that are about 100 mm in diameter with different thicknesses. These pucks allow the Versamill to create multiple single units, multiple connected units, occlusal guards, surgical guides, sleep apnea appliances, clear orthodontic aligners, custom implant abutments, and more. This is the true power of a 5-axis mill. It can create almost anything you can imagine as long as you have the raw material.

Speaking of material, the Versamill 5X400 can use a variety of dental materials. Imagine being able to create prosthetics using wax (yes, it can actually mill wax) for use in the lost wax technique. It can also mill zirconia, PMMA, glass ceramics, lithium disilicate, lava ultimate, and titanium.

The quality of the finished product? Amazing and sometimes beyond amazing. The idea of being able to create almost any dental restoration in your office in a matter of minutes is an incredible service to offer your patients. Because it is open source, it doesn’t matter what scanning system you use.

The market for mills will continue to grow. They are phenomenal devices that allow offices to create almost any prosthetic or appliance patients may need. If you’ve ever considered in-office milling, put Axsys on a short list!

Wrapping Up

There you have the top 5 test-drives of 2020. Hopefully, you’ve found some things here that strike your fancy. Rest assured, I’ll be back in 2021 to let you know about the biggest improvements in our profession. Thanks for reading Dental Products Report® and Technology Evangelist. You folks rock!

Tuesday, December 15, 2020

MouthWatch Intraoral Camera Wins 2020 Dental Townie Choice Award® by an Unprecedented 100% Write-In Vote

 


A big congratulations to MouthWatch, LLC for their Townie Award.  I discovered the company and their incredible camera 3-4 years ago and I've been a big fan ever since.  They make a camera that takes incredibly high resolution and clear. photos.  The best part?  It does it for around $300 U.S.  You read that right... $300.

MouthWatch came to market and lowered the price of an indispensable piece of equipment by 90%.  Suddenly the intraoral camera went from a "nice thing to have" to a "must have" simply because you didn't have to dip into your retirement fund to buy one.

Not only do we have one in each of our treatment areas, we even have backups in case something happens to one.  In the days of $3500 cameras, I didn't not want $10,500 sitting in an inventory.  Now I have 3 MouthWatch cameras in a drawer for "just in case" situations.  This is all because the company turned the cost of cameras on its head.  I salute company CEO Brant Herman for that.




MouthWatch, LLC, a leader in innovative teledentistry solutions, digital case presentation tools and intraoral imaging devices, was recently awarded a 2020 Dental Townie Choice Award® for its popular MouthWatch Intraoral Camera, which was included in the office equipment category.


According to Dentaltown,  “Earlier this year, Dentaltown readers voted in droves for their favorite products, services, and equipment—the elements that make their lives more productive, and their staff and patients happier. If you already use their products in your practice, you can feel great knowing that you share your peers’ passion for finding the most effective ways to improve your patients’ experience. And if you’re looking for a better product or service, you can see what other docs have chosen as their raving favorites.”

MouthWatch founder and CEO Brant Herman said, “We’re extremely excited to have won our very first Dental Townie Choice Award® and equally humbled that our customers – many of them Townies – took the time to write in their nominations!” I’ve reviewed the list of this year’s winners and I’m proud that MouthWatch is included among such great dental companies.”


The MouthWatch Intraoral Camera provides an unparalleled balance of price and performance. It’s easy to use, automatically takes sharp images, and integrates seamlessly with most imaging software –  all for $299.00 or less. For more information visit, https://www.mouthwatch.com/intraoral-cameras/.


About MouthWatch LLC:

Headquartered in Metuchen, New Jersey, MouthWatch, LLC is a leader in innovative teledentistry solutions, digital case presentation tools and intraoral imaging devices. The company is dedicated to finding new ways to constantly improve the dental health experience for both patient and provider.


In 2020, MouthWatch received the following awards and accolades:  The 2020 Dental Townie Choice Award® for the affordable / high quality MouthWatch Intraoral Camera, the 2020 Cellerant Best of Class Award for TeleDent™, the provider-focused, patient-friendly teledentistry platform; TeleDent also won Dentistry Today’s  2020 Top Innovative Products Award and the MouthWatch Intraoral Camera was awarded the Dentistry Today Top 100 Products Award. The company was also ranked #1303 in the 2020 Inc. 5000 list of the Fastest Growing Privately Held Companies. For more information, visit www.MouthWatch.com.


Monday, December 14, 2020

Another Covid-19 Related Scam

 


As I've mentioned here many times in the past, one of the things that cyber criminals use to great effect is Social Engineering.  Basically, if you can get someone to do something for you, that makes your job that much easier.  And crooks are good at it.

Utilizing tricks such as emails that have an attachment that, when opened, lets the criminal gain control, to calling someone and convincing them to give up their username and password, hackers use social engineering to gain control.

It's sad, but it's true that you have to stop and consider the effect you can have by dealing with things from both known and unknown individuals.  The unknown part is a *bit* easier to guard against simply because if you don't know someone, it's easier to treat them with suspicion.  Yet, hackers often try to send phishing emails that appear to be from people you know, which entices you to click on attachments more readily.

Today's post though, is of an email scam with a different bit of a slant.  The Covid-19 pandemic has created a lot of confusion with financial scams that appear to be from people offering financial help.  These are probably a bit easier to slip by people because of financial stresses and also due to the myriad of stories in mainstream media about government financial help.

I wanted to share with you an email that I've received.  It appears to be a sort of weird twist on the "Nigerian Prince" email scam.  However, when you can send millions of these out, it's unfortunately true that most likely a few trusting people will respond.  The moral to this story is always keep your guard up.

Here is what showed up in my Inbox on Saturday night...

Due to the various looses caused by this Covid19 - Corona virus. 

World Bank organization has compensate you with sum of $2.200,000 

USD.



Please accept this little offer and as well our apologies and 

sympathy


.


Kindly confirm your availability to receive your compensation.



This is the information you will forward to claim your 

compensation.



1. Full name


2. House address


3. Telephone number


4. Age & occupation




Contact Payment Officer;


Name Mr. Thomas Clark


E-mail : barr_clarkthomas@yahoo.com


Forward it to the paying centre as directed above.




Thank you

Mr Phillip Kelly