Monday, November 6, 2017

Garrison FitStrip Interproximal Finishers - Review

FitStrip Logo FINAL.jpgSuper Fine Double Sided 1 adjusted.jpg
 
 
Adding the post from last Thursday, here is something else from Garrison Dental.  In this case, however, rather than starting an evaluation, I’m glad to report on a completed eval of Garrison’s FitStrip system.
 
As the logo above states, the word “FIT” stands for “Flexible Interproximal Twistable”, which is a good description.  Let me explain why.
 
For interproximal finishing, most of us are used to having 2 size/shape choices:
  • Finishing strips:  These are long strips made of either plastic or thin metal and coated with different grits of abrasives.  Once they are placed interproximally, they are gently pulled side to side to smooth the restoration.  The biggest problem with these products is the placement.  The plastic strips tend to buckle or fold up as you try to slide them between the teeth.  Once in place they can occasionally be difficult to move.  The metal strips are stronger and hence easier to slide between the teeth, however they have a nasty problem of slicing the lips right at the commissure.  Leaving someone with the equivalent of a “paper cut” at the corner of the mouth is never a good thing.
  • C-shaped bands:  These are abrasive strips placed between the ends of a plastic “arch” with finger grips placed on the arch.  The idea is that the grips & arch allow for a small band and leverage to get them between the teeth.  The problem with these is that sometimes the shortness of the band (which is usually an advantage) does provide enough movement to get the band to slide between the teeth.  Also, because the strip is short, it can be difficult to get adequate smoothing as you can only move a few millimeters in either direction.

To correct the problems inherent in both of these systems, Garrison got smart and decided to approach the problem from 2 different ways.

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Notice in the image above that the FitStrip has a handle.  This allows for really good leverage when placing the strip and/or when moving it back and forth.  The handle lets the operator gain a good mechanical advantage to place and move the strip while maintaining good control.  The leverage of the handle is similar to the leverage of a metal finishing strip, but without the potential for cutting the patient.  However, I know many of you are thinking “what about using this device on the molars?  The handle is going to make it difficult if not impossible to use.”  That’s a great thought and one that the smart people at Garrison had as well.  The remedy?  In areas where you don’t need the handle or it would be an impediment, simply unscrew the handle from the rest of the assembly.
 
The result is the image below:
 
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Removing the handle creates the small saw-like device above.  Impressive isn’t it?  One of the other really nice features that Garrison thought to include was the ability to curve the band.  A band that better matches the natural curve of the natural tooth will provide a much better finish.  The blue roller can be rotated in either direction and as it is rotated it causes the band to curve forward or back.  This lets the band be contoured for the proper tooth or from one tooth to another if you are dealing with a MO on one tooth and a DO on the other.  That is where the “twist” in the name comes from.
 
They come in a variety of grits, serrated,  and also a variety of “holes” for finishing. They can also be purchased in single or double sided.
  • Super fine 15 micron
  • Fine 30 micron
  • Medium 46 micron
  • Coarse 90 micron
  • Serrated

The FitStrip has performed extremely well in my hands.  It has allowed me to get into difficult areas with relative ease and has provided incredibly smooth finishes for my restorations.

Garrison has hit a home run with this product.  My ranking is my highest.  The Garrison FitStrips are Highly Recommended!!!  

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