Monday, June 19, 2017

The 2017 ADA Meeting in Atlanta will Feature Cancer Prevention Symposium

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For regular readers, you know how passionate I am about fighting, detecting, and preventing oral and pharyngeal cancer.  It’s a horrible disease and there needs to be a concerted effort by dentistry, medicine, and the media to bring this disease to the forefront of public attention.
 
To that end, the ADA is presenting a symposium on the subject at the ADA meeting in Atlanta this fall.  Here is all of the info from the ADA:
 
How do dental professionals fit in with oncologists, head and neck surgeons and other health professionals when it comes to helping prevent, recognize and manage oropharyngeal cancer?

Experts associated with the ADA, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will help answer that question — and share the latest science and statistics related to the disease — at a symposium preceding ADA 2017 – America's Dental Meeting.


Working Together Against Oropharyngeal Cancer is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Oct. 18. Registration includes 4.5 hours of continuing education credits, a luncheon, a networking break and an all-access pass to ADA 2017 — America's Dental Meeting. To register, visit ADA.org/ADA17OralCancer.

Participants will get a look at an updated clinical practice guideline for potentially malignant disorders in the oral cavity completed this year by a panel of ADA member volunteers and staff from the ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry. The guideline is slated to be published as the cover story of the October issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association.

"As oral health care professionals we simply must continue learning about oral cancer trends and appropriate management," said Dr. Lauren Patton, member of the guideline panel and a professor and the chair of the department dental ecology at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry. "Oropharyngeal cancer is a potentially deadly disease if not detected early and brings significant dental morbidity to patients without our active participation in their care before, during, and after surgery, radiation therapy, or chemoradiation, is completed."

The symposium is a result of a collaboration announced earlier this year between the ADA and MD Anderson. Symposium presenters include physicians and dentists associated with the ADA and the cancer center.

"I'm excited to be able to meet with the dental community and work toward educating dentists more broadly about the human papillomavirus," said Erich Sturgis, M.D., a symposium presenter and professor in the department of head and neck surgery and department of epidemiology at MD Anderson. "While cigarette smoking is the overwhelming cause of oral cavity (mouth) cancers, HPV is now the leading cause of oropharyngeal (throat) cancers. The rates of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers are rising at epidemic proportions in this country, although many of these cases could be prevented by a safe and effective vaccine given in childhood. Greater awareness may also provide an opportunity for earlier diagnosis of these cancers." 

In addition to Dr. Sturgis, symposium presenters include Lois Ramondetta, M.D., professor in the department of gynecologic oncology and reproductive medicine at MD Anderson and chief of the division of gynecologic oncology at the Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital in Houston, Texas; Dr. Theresa Hofstede, associate professor in the department of head and neck surgery at MD Anderson; Melinda Wharton, M.D., director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Dr. Mark Lingen, professor in the department of pathology at the University of Chicago Medicine; Dr. Marcelo Araujo, vice president of the ADA Science Institute; Dr. Dave Preble, vice president of the ADA Practice Institute; Katherine Hutcheson, Ph.D., associate professor in the section of speech pathology and audiology in the department of head and neck surgery at MD Anderson; and Neil Gross, M.D., associate professor at the department of head and neck surgery at MD Anderson.

For more information about the symposium or to register for it, go online to ADA.org/ADA17OralCancer.

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