Monday, January 2, 2017

Experts Warn E-cigarette Exposure can Trigger Severe Gum Disease and Increase Risk of Oral Cancer

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An interesting article I saw on the Daily Mail regarding e-cigarettes.  While many are advocating for them as a safer alternative to the real thing, many experts are starting to feel otherwise:
 

Exposure to chemicals in e-cigarettes could trigger severe gum disease – and even increase the risk of mouth cancer, scientists have warned.


New studies have highlighted concerns over potential damage to cells in the gums from vapour released by the devices.


Tests showed substances used to flavour e-cigarettes cause inflammation and damage tissue that helps hold teeth in place.


Experts at the University of California Los Angeles found e-cigarettes contained toxic substances and nanoparticles that could kill the top layer of cells in the mouth and gums.


They warned the changes noticed in tests could increase the risk of mouth cancer if the same thing happened in e-cigarette users.


Since then, a team at Université Laval in Canada has found gum tissue cells appear to mutate when they come into contact with e-cigarette vapour.


They warn: ‘The adverse effects of e-cigarette vapour could lead to oral disease.’


 

Another study, at the University of Rochester in New York, found flavourings in e-cigarettes triggered inflammation and DNA damage and that ‘vaping’ – the name giving to using e-cigarettes – damaged tissue joining the teeth to the jawbone.


 

Researcher Dr Irfan Rahman said: ‘When the vapours from an e-cigarette are burned, it causes cells to release inflammatory proteins. This aggravates stress within cells, resulting in damage that could lead to oral diseases.’


 

Nearly three million people in Britain use e-cigarettes. Public Health England insists they are 95 per cent safer than tobacco.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4044776/New-e-cigarettes-alert-experts-warn-exposure-chemicals-trigger-severe-gum-disease-increase-risk-mouth-cancer.html#ixzz4TKN4oAKi 
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