Monday, April 27, 2015

Even Tor Can't Provide Guaranteed Anonymity Anymore...

tor logo.png
 
For years now there’s been a part of the Internet dubbed the “Dark Internet”. I’t a place where all kinds of nefarious things go on and many of them have been brought by theTor Browser.  It’s a way of remaining invisible on the ‘net.  It’s been a very successful way for hiding out on the Internet fir quite some time now.
 
However, anonymity is a lot like locks, you know, locks keep the honest people honest.  However, if someone *really* & wants to get past the lock… they will.  I mean, take a look at the London Jewelry Robbery that happened over Easter weekend and tell me that locks & security work.  
 
So… it really isn’t a huge surprise for me to find out that after enjoying a fairly long time at the top of the anonymity chart, the Tor browser system now has some problems.
 
For those of you not familiar with it, here is the description directly from the Tor Project webpage.  
 
The Tor software protests you by bouncing your communications around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from learning what sites you visit, it prevents the sites you visit from learning your physical location, and it lets you access sites which are blocked.
 
The Tor Browser lets you use Tor on Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux without needing to install any software.  It can run off a USB flash drive, comes with a preconfigured web browser to protect you anonymity, and is self-contained.
 
Now, however, comes word that Tor servers are susceptible to the Heartbleed bug.  I won’t go into all the details here, but if you want more info on Heartbleed here’s a link with more info than most of you would ever want.  
 
For info on the Heartbleed bug for dental professionals, we’ve got a nice “go to” piece at Dental Products Report online.  
 
So, if you are a Tor user, you should be aware that you *might* be at risk.  The other thing to remember is that you never know if you’re anonymous truly, or not.  It’s hard to prove a negative…

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