Friday, August 3, 2012

Sirona Now Exclusive to Patterson Dental



In a move that was a bit surprising to me, Sirona has announced that they are beginning an exclusive distribution agreement in the U.S. with Patterson Dental.  While an exclusive has existed for years over distribution of CEREC, this agreement will encompass *all* Sirona equipment.  Here are all the details:

Sirona Expands its Exclusive Distribution Agreement with Patterson Companies, Inc.
LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jun. 1, 2012-- Sirona (NASDAQ: SIRO), the dental technology leader, today announces that it has expanded its exclusive distribution agreement with Patterson Companies, Inc. The existing agreements have been amended with immediate effect and now include all Sirona products for the US market. All US dealers that were supporting Sirona as of June 1, 2012 may continue to order and receive equipment until September 1 of this year. Spare parts for these dealers may be ordered indefinitely.
Jost Fischer, Chairman and CEO of Sirona commented: “The expansion of our exclusive relationship with Patterson will enable us to strengthen our go to market approach and grow in the US, by increasing the focus on the seamless integration of our best in class product offerings and digital solutions. Internationally we continue to grow, with Henry Schein being our largest and most important distributor and core partner in Europe and a major partner in Canada. With our global sales and service infrastructure we are very well positioned for continued long-term robust revenue growth.”
About Sirona Dental Systems, Inc.
Sirona, the dental technology leader, has served dealers and dentists worldwide for more than 130 years. Sirona develops, manufactures, and markets a complete line of dental products, including CAD/CAM restoration systems (CEREC), digital intra-oral, panoramic and 3D imaging systems, dental treatment centers and handpieces. Visit http://www.sirona.com for more information about Sirona and its products.

This release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are information of a non-historical nature and are subject to risks and uncertainties that are beyond the Company's ability to control. The matters discussed in this news release are subject to various factors which could cause actual events and results to differ materially from such statements. Such factors include uncertainties as to the future sales volume of the Company's products, the possibility of changing economic, market and competitive conditions, dependence on products, dependence on key personnel, technological developments, intense competition, market uncertainties, dependence on distributors, ability to manage growth, dependence on key suppliers, and other risks and uncertainties including those detailed in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company undertakes no obligation and does not intend to update these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after this release. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this release.

1 comment:

  1. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), or the pathological restriction of venous vessel discharge from the CNS has been proposed by Zamboni, et al, as having a correlative relationship to Multiple Sclerosis. From a clinical perspective, it has been demonstrated that the narrowed jugular veins in an MS patient, once widened, do affect the presenting symptoms of MS and the overall health of the patient. It has also been noted that these same veins once treated, restenose after a time in the majority of cases. Why the veins restenose is speculative. One insight, developed through practical observation, suggests that there are gaps in the therapy protocol as it is currently practiced. In general, CCSVI therapy has focused on directly treating the venous system and the stenosed veins. Several other factors that would naturally affect vein recovery have received much less consideration. As to treatment for CCSVI, it should be noted that no meaningful aftercare protocol based on evidence has been considered by the main proponents of the ‘liberation’ therapy (neck venoplasty). In fact, in all of the clinics or hospitals examined for this study, patients weren’t required to stay in the clinical setting any longer than a few hours post-procedure in most cases. Even though it has been observed to be therapeutically useful by some of the main early practitioners of the ‘liberation’ therapy, follow-up, supportive care for recovering patients post-operatively has not seriously been considered to be part of the treatment protocol. To date, follow-up care has primarily centered on when vein re-imaging should be done post-venoplasty. The fact is, by that time, most patients have restenosed (or partially restenosed) and the follow-up Doppler testing is simply detecting restenosis and retrograde flow in veins that are very much deteriorated due to scarring left by the initial procedure. This article discusses a variable approach as to a combination of safe and effective interventional therapies that have been observed to result in enduring venous drainage of the CNS to offset the destructive effects of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and to regenerate disease damaged tissue.
    As stated, it has been observed that a number of presenting symptoms of MS almost completely vanish as soon as the jugulars are widened and the flows equalize in most MS patients. Where a small number of MS patients have received no immediate benefit from the ‘liberation’ procedure, flows in subject samples have been shown not to have equalized post-procedure in these patients and therefore even a very small retrograde blood flow back to the CNS can offset the therapeutic benefits. Furthermore once the obstructed veins are further examined for hemodynamic obstruction and widened at the point of occlusion in those patients to allow full drainage, the presenting symptoms of MS retreat. This noted observation along with the large number of MS patients who have CCSVI establish a clear association of vein disease with MS, although it is clearly not the disease ‘trigger’.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=978

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